Student Collaborates for Research in Colleton County

Casey Rowe, a USC Salkehatchie biology major, worked as a research technician this summer for College of Charleston graduate student Ryan Wenzel. Rowe assisted with Wenzel’s study titled, “Amphibian Community Dynamics during Longleaf Pine Restoration.” The study took place on the 600-acre Bonnie Doone Tract in southern Colleton County. The property is managed by the The Nature Conservancy. Rowe’s duties included the capture and identification of adult and larval salamander, frog, and toad species associated with upland isolated wetlands. He had an opportunity to sample amphibians using drift fence/pitfall traps and minnow traps in addition to collecting wetland hydrology data.

Casey Rowe, a USC Salkehatchie biology major, worked as a research technician this summer for College of Charleston graduate student Ryan Wenzel. Rowe assisted with Wenzel’s study titled, “Amphibian Community Dynamics during Longleaf Pine Restoration.” The study took place on the 600-acre Bonnie Doone Tract in southern Colleton County. The property is managed by the The Nature Conservancy. Rowe’s duties included the capture and identification of adult and larval salamander, frog, and toad species associated with upland isolated wetlands. He had an opportunity to sample amphibians using drift fence/pitfall traps and minnow traps in addition to collecting wetland hydrology data.

Casey Rowe
Casey Rowe sets minnow traps for larval amphibians

Casey Rowe, a USC Salkehatchie biology major, worked as a research technician this summer for College of Charleston graduate student Ryan Wenzel. Rowe assisted with Wenzel’s study titled, “Amphibian Community Dynamics during Longleaf Pine Restoration.” The study took place on the 600-acre Bonnie Doone Tract in southern Colleton County. The property is managed by the The Nature Conservancy. Rowe’s duties included the capture and identification of adult and larval salamander, frog, and toad species associated with upland isolated wetlands. He had an opportunity to sample amphibians using drift fence/pitfall traps and minnow traps in addition to collecting wetland hydrology data.

Casey Rowe
Casey Rowe sets minnow traps for larval amphibians

Casey Rowe, a USC Salkehatchie biology major, worked as a research technician this summer for College of Charleston graduate student Ryan Wenzel. Rowe assisted with Wenzel’s study titled, “Amphibian Community Dynamics during Longleaf Pine Restoration.” The study took place on the 600-acre Bonnie Doone Tract in southern Colleton County. The property is managed by the The Nature Conservancy. Rowe’s duties included the capture and identification of adult and larval salamander, frog, and toad species associated with upland isolated wetlands. He had an opportunity to sample amphibians using drift fence/pitfall traps and minnow traps in addition to collecting wetland hydrology data.

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